Mary Travers

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8 Tips for Writing Great Lyrics

Anyone can write good song lyrics. Sometimes I find myself whistling or humming catchy words that linger in my head. Other times can I write down a few verses that could be easily converted into text. Experts from the fields of music, song writing and psychology all agree, this spontaneous childhood room is where the most creative ideas are born. Sometimes our best work only happens when we no expectations.

Take the song "Puff The Magic Dragon". It began asa poem by Leonard Lipton wrote. While at Cornell Lipton was a friend with a roommate of Peter Yarrow. In 1959 he wrote a poem about Jackie Paper, who called plays with his imaginary dragon named Puff in a village at sea Honalee. Although Lipton forgot the poem was Yarrow put it and it comes to music. Yarrow began the song with his friends Paul Stookey and Mary Travers and the rest is history.

Although spontaneity is a good starting point for poetry,Most professionals follow a few basic rules.

# 1 Make The storyline Consistent: grow "In Puff The Magic Dragon", Jackie Paper, loses interest in his imaginary friend, "unfortunately slipped into his cave." If Lipton had his poem talks about why he likes to golf to tennis ended, for example, the story would have fallen apart and probably caught the eye of Peter Yarrow.

# 2 is a catchy title: Choose a title that not only the framework for your story, but has a catchySound on it. A few good songs that come to mind are: Emotions, White Christmas, a dollar in my jeans, lady, Lady Lay, El Paso, I love how you love me, until it's time for you to go, fever, Suspicious Minds, My
Way. . . the list goes on.

# 3 Use a well-defined rhyming scheme: Songwriters often talk about texts in terms of AB AB AA BB or any other form. What they mean is that the last word in certain lines of rhythm. Take a look at the lyrics to "Puff the Magic Dragon". In thefirst row, matched Lipton "sea" with "Honah-Lee" on the A line and "Puff" and "things" on the B line. This pattern is pleasing to the ear. [For a more detailed discussion of poetic forms, in every good book to take on the songwriting.]

# 4 Using internal rhythms as long as they do not break the story line: An inner rhythm is simple rhyming words in the middle and the last word of the line. Although this line makes it interesting and pleasing to the ear, an error early Songwriteroften with an internal rhythm, the importance of power

not exactly on the action.

Listener # 5 Repeat certain words Hook: The concept of the "hook" is used in songs, stories, books, plays and films plot. It is a word or two or theme idea that grabs the listener or viewer's attention and is repeated over the course of work. In songs, the hook is often found in the title. Check out the song "Feelings" by Morris Albert. How often does theWord "feelings" appear in the title and text?

# 6 Learn From The Masters: Browse through song books from your local music store or some of the public library. You can bet on great songwriters as Lennon and McCartney, James Taylor, Jim Croce, Paul Simon and Bob Dylan to incorporate these rules into their songs, or choose cancel to be aware because they have mastered the basic principles of lyric writing.

# 7 confirm with people at your same or better level of difficulty:There is a reason why many of the world have been the most memorable songs by songwriter team wrote. The advent of the World Wide Web, it just has to meet and share ideas and projects with individuals and groups to join, as the Nashville Songwriters Association of America.

# 8 Be original, have fun and Keep On Writing!

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October 20, 2010 - Posted by | Mary Travers Articles | ,

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